The Sculptures

We have been very fortunate to engage the respected sculptor Phillip Piperides to produce the bronze statues of the wife and the soldier.  The Perides Foundry is in Brisbane.   We felt it was very important that the work was done in Australia, by Australians using Australian materials.

Mervyn McKenny, President of the Stanthorpe Historical Society, Sam Giacca who donated the land for the monument, and Lorene Long
Mervyn McKenny, President of the Stanthorpe Historical Society,
Sam Giacca who donated the land for the monument, and Lorene Long


Why did the WW1 men volunteer to fight overseas?
What was the most important outcome of the Australians fighting in WW1?

We celebrate Anzac Day each year, and have done so for 103 years, remembering the fallen.
Why have we not celebrated the return of those who fought and survived the war?
Why have we not celebrated the contribution of the women, both during and after the war?

Much of this work will be funded through the sales of engraved pavers along the Armistice Walk from the car park to the monument.  Members of the public can commemorate their own returned family members by purchasing a paver for $100.  This will be the first time the wives of the returned men are included in a monument.  Any family member who served overseas in any conflict, or any wife of a returned man can be included.  This will provide a place for later generations to visit either during Remembrance Day or any other anniversaries which are relevant to the family concerned.

Cottonvale site visit
Phillip Peperides talking with Franco Arcidiacono and Lorene Long on site at Cottonvale
Planning is important
Photo courtesy Lee Beanland